in the Shadow of Greatness

 

March 21, 2007

IMC :: Tir, for those not wielding Grayswandir

from the AML:
Do other Amberites have the ability to interact with the phantasms of Tir-na Nog'th, via some other artifact or technique? Is the power that Corwin has in Tir unique?

Referencing back to this entry, Tir, City in the Sky.

Corwin has two advantages in the scene: first he is of the line of Faiella and that blood has an affinity for moonlight and sky. Second, he has Grayswandir, the nightblade, which has ancient connections to Tir.

If Corwin's ability is unique, then when other Amberites visit Tir, is it merely a picture show for them, something that they cannot interact with, and as such is it any less valuable to them?

Corwin compares Tir to a casting of cards: a place where inspiration might strike. Interaction with the visions is not required. IMC, the blood of Faiella can get responses. Tir also allows access to arcane planes that Amber is protected from. In this latter sense, the sword has some special abilities.

If Corwin's ability is not unique, then what methods might an Amberite use to interact with the phantasms of Tir-na Nog'th? Does Oberon grant each of his children some method for interacting with the phantasms of Tir-na Nog'th? Only his most favored ones?

IMC, Oberon has little to do with it. He does have something to do with Grayswandir going to Corwin. Oberon did not discover Tir, Faiella did.

Interactions might happen through sorcery, blood of Pattern, certain ancient powers that existed before Pattern and other rare forces.

Why does Corwin react so strongly to the phantasms? He knows, certainly, that these are things not as they are, but as they might have been. Is he inexperienced in the ways of Tir-na Nog'th, that is, has he visited but few times before?

Tir provokes emotional connections and jumbles sensations if you are susceptible to its influence. It is also usually a private experience where you can react plainly without artifice.

Why does one wake from a dream in tears or afraid? There are as many cases as there might be dreams.


Filed under : IMC at 21.03.2007
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